Perseverance and Survival.

Book Review for “Her Last Flight” by Beatriz Williams. Summary: In 1947, photographer and war correspondent Janey Everett arrives at a remote surfing village on the Hawaiian island of Kauai to research a planned biography of forgotten aviation pioneer Sam Mallory, who joined the loyalist forces in the Spanish Civil War and never returned. Obsessed … Continue reading Perseverance and Survival.

A Revealingly Obscure Story.

Book Review for "The Mystery of Henri Pick" by David Foenkinos (Translated by Sam Taylor) "In the small town of Crozon in Brittany (France), a library houses manuscripts that were rejected for publication: the faded dreams of aspiring writers. Visiting while on holiday, young editor Delphine Despero is thrilled to discover a novel so powerful … Continue reading A Revealingly Obscure Story.

#ShortStorySunday – One Novelette and An Anthology

Book Reviews for “Charity Girl” by David Blixt, and “Another Time Another Place: An Anthology of Short Stories” from Writing Group, Writers@… I seem to be getting a little bit behind in my reviewing, so because these two books are both short, I thought I’d combine the two into one post for #ShortStorySunday. “Charity Girl” … Continue reading #ShortStorySunday – One Novelette and An Anthology

Nine Times Naughty Atwood

Book Review for “Stone Mattress: Nine Wicked Tales” by Margaret Atwood According Harper’s Bazar’s the blurb on the back of this book, “Stone Mattress, a collection of nine, acerbic, mischievous, gulpable short stories, addresses themes that will resonate with anyone familiar with Atwood’s writing. Atwood’s gimlet eye and sharp tongue are turned on the ageing … Continue reading Nine Times Naughty Atwood

Saving a Whole World.

Book Review for “The Last Train to London” by Meg Waite Clayton. This is the fictionalized story of Geertruida Wijsmuller, aka “Tante Truus” the Dutch, Christian woman who saved over 10,000 mostly Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis through what came to be known as the Kindertransport. Although this is historical fiction, the … Continue reading Saving a Whole World.

Three for the Price of One.

Book Review for “The Lady and the Highwayman” by Sarah M. Eden. During Victorian England, there were essentially two types of books available. Of course, one was considered literature; well written tales that both middle and upper classes found worthy of reading, known as "silver-fork" novels. The other was what they called “penny dreadfuls” which … Continue reading Three for the Price of One.

An Almost Famous Woman

Charmian London was the second wife of the highly prolific author, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist, and political essayist Jack “Wolf” London. Although only married for 10 years, their relationship was highly publicized and public.

A Female Journalistic Pioneer

Book Review of “What Girls are Good For: A Novel of Nellie Bly” by David Blixt. Anyone who has studied journalism, or is interested in historical women who were pioneers in their fields, will probably have heard of Nellie Bly, aka Elizabeth Cochrane. Nellie was famous mostly for getting herself admitted to an insane asylum … Continue reading A Female Journalistic Pioneer

Guest Author Post: Jacey Bedford and her Psi-Tech Universe Trilogy

Many years ago, I met Jacey Bedford through the "usenet" group misc.writing - back in late 20th century, when we were young (read more about that here), and Jacey was only an aspiring author! But look at her today - she's published five books!  Although I don't read the genre she writes in, I am … Continue reading Guest Author Post: Jacey Bedford and her Psi-Tech Universe Trilogy

Guest Author Post by Roz Morris: Out of sight, but not out of mind

As noted in my recent review of Roz Morris' travel diary book Not Quite Lost: Travels without a Sense of Direction, Roz's afterward for that darling travel diary truly fascinated and more importantly, intrigued me. So I requested she write a post for this blog based on some of the things she mentioned there. Without … Continue reading Guest Author Post by Roz Morris: Out of sight, but not out of mind