Net and Let.

Book Review for “Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell For those who don’t know, Hamnet was the name of William Shakespeare’s only son, who died at the age of 11. In O’Farrell’s latest novel, she takes up the scholarly presumption that there was a direct connection between his son’s death and his play “Hamlet.” To do this, … Continue reading Net and Let.

Theatrical Turbulence

Book Review of "Hag-Seed" by Margaret Atwood. It was Felix’s dream to mount his own version of Shakespeare’s play “The Tempest” at the  (Canadian) Makeshiweg Theater festival, but before he could get started, he found himself ousted as their artistic director. That was the last blow, since came on the heels of a broken marriage, and … Continue reading Theatrical Turbulence

Elizabethian Fury in a Modern Female

Book Review of "Vinegar Girl" by Anne Tyler. In Anne Tyler's latest book, she takes on the task of modernizing Shakespeare's play "The Taming of the Shrew." To remind you, the original story is a simple one: Baptista has two beautiful daughters, the younger one is the sweet Bianca, and the older one is the … Continue reading Elizabethian Fury in a Modern Female

The Mystery of Christopher Marlowe

Book Review of "Tamburlaine Must Die" by Louise Welsh. During the Elizabethan era, Christopher Marlowe was a famous and popular playwright, but today when we think of that time, practically the only writer that comes to mind is Shakespeare. One reason for this could be Marlowe's untimely and early death, at the height of his … Continue reading The Mystery of Christopher Marlowe

The Last of Will and his Testament

Book Review of "Will" by Christopher Rush. Biographies can often be terribly boring, academic tomes that find interest only to those fascinated by the subjects. Autobiographies can be terribly indulgent works that leave out anything negative about the person. In general, it is far more fun to read fiction. What makes this book different is … Continue reading The Last of Will and his Testament