#6Degrees of Separation for November 7, 2020.

From “The Room” Jonas Karlsson to “The Little Old Lady Who Broke All the Rules” by Catharina Ingelman-Sundberg. This is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. Each month a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. A book … Continue reading #6Degrees of Separation for November 7, 2020.

PR Goes Postal.

Book Review for “Long Live the Post Horn!” by Vigdis Hjorth, translated by Charlotte Barslund. Summary (Goodreads): “Ellinor, a 35-year-old media consultant, has not been feeling herself; she's not been feeling much at all lately. Far beyond jaded, she picks through an old diary and fails to recognize the woman in its pages, seemingly as … Continue reading PR Goes Postal.

Bride and Evidence – #ShortStorySunday – A Novella and A Short Story

Reviews for the novella “And the Bride Closed the Door” by Ronit Matalon, and the short story “Evidence of the Affair” by Taylor Jenkins Reid. Once again, I seem to be getting a little bit behind in my reviewing, so because these two works are both short fiction, I thought I’d combine the two into … Continue reading Bride and Evidence – #ShortStorySunday – A Novella and A Short Story

A Bunch of Useful Idiots.

Book Review for “Anxious People” by Fredrik Backman. Summary: “Viewing an apartment normally doesn’t turn into a life-or-death situation, but this particular open house becomes just that when a failed bank robber bursts in and takes everyone in the apartment hostage. As the pressure mounts, the eight strangers begin slowly opening up to one another … Continue reading A Bunch of Useful Idiots.

A Revealingly Obscure Story.

Book Review for "The Mystery of Henri Pick" by David Foenkinos (Translated by Sam Taylor) "In the small town of Crozon in Brittany (France), a library houses manuscripts that were rejected for publication: the faded dreams of aspiring writers. Visiting while on holiday, young editor Delphine Despero is thrilled to discover a novel so powerful … Continue reading A Revealingly Obscure Story.

Hiding Her Time.

Book Review for “Vivian” by Christina Hesselholdt. If you’ve never heard of Vivian Maier, that’s totally understandable. In fact, no one knew about her until about 2007, two years before she died, when the contents of her storage facilities were sold because she wasn’t paying her bills. What they found was a trove of her … Continue reading Hiding Her Time.

Fatherhood and its Flaws.

Book Review for “Things My Son Needs to Know about the World” by Fredrik Backman. As a change of pace for Backman, this is not a book of fiction, but rather a type of memoir, which is also something that could be considered an advice book. The publisher calls this a collection of “personal dispatches … Continue reading Fatherhood and its Flaws.

Leaping Late in Life

Book Review of The Little Breton Bistro by Nina George. When 60-year-old Marianne Messmann is visiting Paris on vacation with her husband, she decides to commit suicide by jumping off the Pont Neuf bridge. Her failed attempt leads her to let her husband go back to Germany on his own and search out the Breton … Continue reading Leaping Late in Life

Storms and Longings

Book Review of "Us Against You" by Fredrik Backman Goodreads summarizes Backman’s sequel to his 2017 novel Beartown, saying “After everything that the citizens of Beartown have gone through, they are struck yet another blow when they hear that their beloved local hockey team will soon be disbanded. What makes it worse is the obvious … Continue reading Storms and Longings

Border Life

Book review of All the Rivers by Dorit Rabinyan. Liat is spending time in the New York apartment of friends, while she studies for her translation degree. Hilmi is living in Brooklyn, trying to make it as an artist. Their whirlwind romance would be uneventful except for the fact that Liat is Jewish and comes … Continue reading Border Life