Pieces of Lucy’s Life

Book Review of "Anything is Possible" by Elizabeth Strout. With this book, Strout returns to her connected short story format, which she used for her well-known book, “Olive Kitteridge,” but this time she does so with a type of follow-up to her novel “My Name is Lucy Barton.” These nine stories take place in the … Continue reading Pieces of Lucy’s Life

Guest Author Post: Jacey Bedford and her Psi-Tech Universe Trilogy

Many years ago, I met Jacey Bedford through the "usenet" group misc.writing - back in late 20th century, when we were young (read more about that here), and Jacey was only an aspiring author! But look at her today - she's published five books!  Although I don't read the genre she writes in, I am … Continue reading Guest Author Post: Jacey Bedford and her Psi-Tech Universe Trilogy

An Elmwood Springs Retrospective

Book Review of "The Whole Town's Talking" by Fannie Flagg. Flagg's latest novel returns once again to Elmwood Springs and this time, she tells us everything, starting with its humble beginnings, when young Lordor Nordstrom finds this beautiful spot in Missouri, and decides to make his home there. From there Flagg takes us on a … Continue reading An Elmwood Springs Retrospective

A Compliment to P.G. Wodehouse

Book Review of "Jeeves and the Wedding Bells" by Sebastian Faulks. Who hasn't heard of Jeeves and Wooster - that charmingly bungling gentleman and his inimitable gentleman's gentleman? Who can forget the antics that Bertie Wooster falls into and the ingenious ways that Jeeves is able to manipulate him back to safety? And if you … Continue reading A Compliment to P.G. Wodehouse

A match made in heaven or a literary crime?

Book Review for "Death Comes to Pemberley" by P.D. James. All of Pemberley is getting ready for the annual Lady Anne Ball, and all seems to be going as planned. That is, until the carriage with Elizabeth's sister Lydia shows up. She's all in a tizzy, going on about gunshots in the woods and begging … Continue reading A match made in heaven or a literary crime?