Perseverance and Survival.

Book Review for “Her Last Flight” by Beatriz Williams. Summary: In 1947, photographer and war correspondent Janey Everett arrives at a remote surfing village on the Hawaiian island of Kauai to research a planned biography of forgotten aviation pioneer Sam Mallory, who joined the loyalist forces in the Spanish Civil War and never returned. Obsessed … Continue reading Perseverance and Survival.

Ghosting Science.

Book Review for “The Man Without a Shadow” by Joyce Carol Oates Imagine having such sudden memory loss that anything that happens to you after that incident can only be retained by your brain for just over one minute, and then it is forgotten? When Elihu Hoopes gets encephalitis at the age of 37, it … Continue reading Ghosting Science.

Seasons of Surprises.

Book Review for “The Astonishing Life of August March” by Aaron Jackson According to the blurbs about this debut novel, it is being called “Candide by way of John Irving, with a hint of Charles Dickens.” While I’m not sure if that’s totally accurate, but it surely comes as close as these types of comparisons … Continue reading Seasons of Surprises.

Revelations and Rebellions.

Book Review for “Queen of the Owls” by Barbara Linn Probst Elizabeth has always been the brainy one, the “owl” of the family, so to speak. Now she’s working on her doctorate in art history. Her topic is Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings from her stay in Hawaii. At the same time, Elizabeth is noticing how all … Continue reading Revelations and Rebellions.

Finding Gin’s Fizz

Book Review for “The Wicked Redhead” by Beatriz Williams. There are two main characters in this book. Geneva (aka Ginger, aka Gin) Kelly, and Ella Gilbert. According to Goodreads, Ginger is “a smart-mouthed flapper from Appalachia, barely survived a run-in with her notorious bootlegger stepfather. She and Oliver Anson, a Prohibition agent she has inconveniently … Continue reading Finding Gin’s Fizz

TCL’s Literary Musings: Women’s Fiction.

What is Women's Fiction? Is it really a genre? How does it differ from chick-lit? After the “Top Ten Tuesday” of June 11, where we talked about our “unpopular bookish opinions” I began a discussion with another blogger – Christine who has the blog Life with All the Books – about women’s fiction. In her … Continue reading TCL’s Literary Musings: Women’s Fiction.

Three for the Price of One.

Book Review for “The Lady and the Highwayman” by Sarah M. Eden. During Victorian England, there were essentially two types of books available. Of course, one was considered literature; well written tales that both middle and upper classes found worthy of reading, known as "silver-fork" novels. The other was what they called “penny dreadfuls” which … Continue reading Three for the Price of One.

A Delicious Phoenix.

Book Review for “The Chocolate Maker’s Wife” by Karen Brooks. This is the story of Rosamund, a woman who was both literally and figuratively pulled out of a gutter only to rise up as Lady Blithman, the wife of Sir Everard Blithman, who was on the verge of opening a unique chocolate house in London … Continue reading A Delicious Phoenix.

War with Doughnuts and Coffee.

Book Review for “The Beantown Girls” by Jane Healey. The year is 1944, and Fiona Denning’s fiancé Danny, has been reported missing in action in Germany. Instead of staying home and worrying, she recruits her two best friends from college to join up with the Red Cross to become “Clubmobile Girls,” handing out coffee and … Continue reading War with Doughnuts and Coffee.