A Revealingly Obscure Story.

Book Review for "The Mystery of Henri Pick" by David Foenkinos (Translated by Sam Taylor) "In the small town of Crozon in Brittany (France), a library houses manuscripts that were rejected for publication: the faded dreams of aspiring writers. Visiting while on holiday, young editor Delphine Despero is thrilled to discover a novel so powerful … Continue reading A Revealingly Obscure Story.

Or… a Questionable Closure?

Book Review for “A Curious Beginning: A Veronica Speedwell Mystery” by Deanna Raybourn At the age of only five and twenty, Veronica Speedwell is now not only orphaned, but also without any guardians, as now both her spinster aunts have died. With an aim to start a new life where she can hunt butterflies across … Continue reading Or… a Questionable Closure?

Flighty Fun.

Book Review for “The Lark” by E. Nesbit Written in 1922, this is one of E. Nesbit’s few adult works of fiction, and one of her last to be published before she died. The story follows two young cousins, Jane and Lucille (known mostly as Lucy), whose guardian seems to have lost all their inheritance … Continue reading Flighty Fun.

That should be plural …

Book Review for “The Queen’s Secret: A Novel of England's World War II Queen” by Karen Harper. This biographical, historical fiction novel is about the woman most of us knew as the “Queen Mother,” the woman who is the mother of Queen Elizabeth II, and who stood by her husband, King George VI after he … Continue reading That should be plural …

Lady Bastion of Beer.

Book Review for “The First Emma” by Camille Di Maio. When Otto Koehler brought his brand-new wife Emma to San Antonio to run the beer brewery there, he was both very much in love and very ambitious. Thirty years later, Otto has been dead for many years – killed by one of his mistresses – … Continue reading Lady Bastion of Beer.

#ShortStorySunday – Clearly Blurry Vision.

Book Review for “Redhead by the Side of the Road” by Anne Tyler. As a man in his forties, Micah Mortimer has everything in order. He has his own business where he’s his own boss and only employee, helping people with their computers as the “Tech Hermit”. He is also the super/handyman for the apartment … Continue reading #ShortStorySunday – Clearly Blurry Vision.

Net and Let.

Book Review for “Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell For those who don’t know, Hamnet was the name of William Shakespeare’s only son, who died at the age of 11. In O’Farrell’s latest novel, she takes up the scholarly presumption that there was a direct connection between his son’s death and his play “Hamlet.” To do this, … Continue reading Net and Let.

Seasons of Surprises.

Book Review for “The Astonishing Life of August March” by Aaron Jackson According to the blurbs about this debut novel, it is being called “Candide by way of John Irving, with a hint of Charles Dickens.” While I’m not sure if that’s totally accurate, but it surely comes as close as these types of comparisons … Continue reading Seasons of Surprises.

A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Book Review for “Begin Again” by Ursula Orange. Jane, Florence, Leslie, and Sylvia are four friends from their days at Oxford. Since going down, their lives have taken different paths. Jane and Florence live together in a tiny flat in London; Sylvia and Leslie are back at their family homes. None of them are poor, … Continue reading A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Dialing into Trouble.

Book Review for “The Operator” by Gretchen Berg. Vivian Dalton was born and raised in Wooster (Ohio), and she knows what living in a small town is like – everyone knows everyone else’s business. But as Vivian says, she gets feelings about people, its her intuition. Her daughter Charlotte would say, that it’s more her … Continue reading Dialing into Trouble.