A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Book Review for “Begin Again” by Ursula Orange. Jane, Florence, Leslie, and Sylvia are four friends from their days at Oxford. Since going down, their lives have taken different paths. Jane and Florence live together in a tiny flat in London; Sylvia and Leslie are back at their family homes. None of them are poor, … Continue reading A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Dialing into Trouble.

Book Review for “The Operator” by Gretchen Berg. Vivian Dalton was born and raised in Wooster (Ohio), and she knows what living in a small town is like – everyone knows everyone else’s business. But as Vivian says, she gets feelings about people, its her intuition. Her daughter Charlotte would say, that it’s more her … Continue reading Dialing into Trouble.

The Highest of Serene Societies.

Book Review for “The Girl in White Gloves” by Kerri Maher. Grace Kelly was a young woman on the rise in Hollywood, already with an Oscar award, when she met Rainier, the Prince of Monaco, which led her on a path she never would have scripted for herself. It is a Cinderella, fairy-tale story with … Continue reading The Highest of Serene Societies.

Tempo of Progression.

Book Review for “Take Nothing with You” by Patrick Gale. According to the back of this book, “Eustace, an only child, is leading a strange existence in a houseful of elderly adults. His life changes dramatically with the arrival of Carla Gold, his cello teacher, who casts a heady spell over everyone, including his mother. … Continue reading Tempo of Progression.

Breaking the Broadcasts.

Book Review for “The Lost Girls of Paris” by Pam Jenoff. In the last years of WWII, the UK set into motion a plan to send people into Nazi occupied France where they would work as couriers in situ for the resistance and allied forces, or send vital information, by special coded radio transmissions, back … Continue reading Breaking the Broadcasts.

Finding Gin’s Fizz

Book Review for “The Wicked Redhead” by Beatriz Williams. There are two main characters in this book. Geneva (aka Ginger, aka Gin) Kelly, and Ella Gilbert. According to Goodreads, Ginger is “a smart-mouthed flapper from Appalachia, barely survived a run-in with her notorious bootlegger stepfather. She and Oliver Anson, a Prohibition agent she has inconveniently … Continue reading Finding Gin’s Fizz

Games, Sets, and Mismatched.

Book Review for “Right After the Weather” by Carol Anshaw. Cate is a theater set designer in Chicago, and in 2016 her career has hit a bumpy road, along with her love life, both of which she’s trying to repair. In the meanwhile, her ex-husband and his dog are camping out in the apartment he … Continue reading Games, Sets, and Mismatched.

Saving a Whole World.

Book Review for “The Last Train to London” by Meg Waite Clayton. This is the fictionalized story of Geertruida Wijsmuller, aka “Tante Truus” the Dutch, Christian woman who saved over 10,000 mostly Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis through what came to be known as the Kindertransport. Although this is historical fiction, the … Continue reading Saving a Whole World.

A Good Ghost.

Book Review for “Signed, Mata Hari” by Yannick Murphy. Margaretha Zelle, aka Mata Hari, was a woman who lived a strange and disjointed life, and died in disgrace, executed for her spying during the first World War. This historical, biographical novel describes her complex history from her early life in the Netherlands, to her loveless … Continue reading A Good Ghost.

Three for the Price of One.

Book Review for “The Lady and the Highwayman” by Sarah M. Eden. During Victorian England, there were essentially two types of books available. Of course, one was considered literature; well written tales that both middle and upper classes found worthy of reading, known as "silver-fork" novels. The other was what they called “penny dreadfuls” which … Continue reading Three for the Price of One.