Fatherhood and its Flaws.

Book Review for “Things My Son Needs to Know about the World” by Fredrik Backman. As a change of pace for Backman, this is not a book of fiction, but rather a type of memoir, which is also something that could be considered an advice book. The publisher calls this a collection of “personal dispatches … Continue reading Fatherhood and its Flaws.

Continuing to be

Book review of "I am, I am, I am: Seventeen Brushes with Death" by Maggie O’Farrell Goodreads calls this book a “memoire with a difference - the unputdownable story of an extraordinary woman's life in near-death experiences.” They also say it is “Shocking, electric, unforgettable,” and comment that “It is a book to make you question … Continue reading Continuing to be

Q&A with Eric Houston, author of The Lost Artist: Love Passion War (Part 1)

  I recently heard about Eric Houston's memoir "The Lost Artist: Love Passion War (Part 1)" and was immediately intrigued. While I couldn't fit this book into my reading list, I decided instead to feature this work here, by asking him one question. Here's his answer to: What was one of the most interesting experiences … Continue reading Q&A with Eric Houston, author of The Lost Artist: Love Passion War (Part 1)

The Guestbook Spy

Book Review of "Not Quite Lost: Travels without a Sense of Direction" by Roz Morris It isn't often that I read non-fiction, but when I do, I often find travel books to be the most pleasurable way to remain within the realm of reality. However, sometimes these can be filled with long, drawn-out descriptions of … Continue reading The Guestbook Spy

Now You’re an Immigrant!

Book Review of "Chutzpah & High Heels: The Search for Love and Identity in the Holy Land" by Jessica Fishman. In this memoir, Jessica Fishman details the trials and tribulations of making what we call "Aliyah" - literally meaning to "go up" to Israel. This reminds me of an old, old joke, which goes something … Continue reading Now You’re an Immigrant!

The Scale of a Family

Book Review of "Moonglow by Michael Chabon. Readers of Michael Chabon's novels know that he has a wonderful way of mixing reality and fiction, to the extent that the lines can feel very blurred. I noticed this in his "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," which won him the Pulitzer. Although that novel, (which … Continue reading The Scale of a Family

Depths in simplicity

Book Review of "My Name is Lucy Barton" by Elizabeth Strout. If there is one quote from this novel that both sums it up, and yet is also the exact opposite of what this story tries to do, it is this: "we never know, and never would know, what it would be like to understand … Continue reading Depths in simplicity

That which was gone for those that remain

Book Review of "The Living" by Léan Cullinan. Working on the website for the small publishing house Bell Books is hardly an exciting life. Even so, since it is Cate's first job after graduating Dublin's Trinity College, there is no reason for her to balk about it. She has her college friends and her choir … Continue reading That which was gone for those that remain

Get Kissed by Kate and her Stories!

Book Review of "Me: Stories of My Life" by Katharine Hepburn. Usually, I don't read non-fiction and biographies are often iffy since you can never tell how much of it is true and how much is rumor or gossip. As for autobiographies, well, most non-writers with interesting lives usually need a ghostwriter, which often produce … Continue reading Get Kissed by Kate and her Stories!

An Occupied Island and Unusual Occupations

Book Review of "The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society" by Mary Ann Shaffer & Annie Barrows. When the Nazis occupied the island of Guernsey during WW2, some of the inhabitants tried to carry on as usual. Others felt they should try to do something in defiance of their captors. When their gatherings become … Continue reading An Occupied Island and Unusual Occupations