More Daring than Darling.

Book Review for “Lady Clementine” by Marie Benedict. This is the story of Clementine Churchill, the woman married to Winston Churchill, best known as the man who was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Although most people know of Winston’s exploits, which included successes and failures alike, the woman at his side set a … Continue reading More Daring than Darling.

Breaking the Broadcasts.

Book Review for “The Lost Girls of Paris” by Pam Jenoff. In the last years of WWII, the UK set into motion a plan to send people into Nazi occupied France where they would work as couriers in situ for the resistance and allied forces, or send vital information, by special coded radio transmissions, back … Continue reading Breaking the Broadcasts.

Restoring Lost Loves.

Book Review for “The Ghost of Madison Avenue” by Nancy Bilyeau. Helen O’Neill, the only daughter of the Connelly family, has been a widow for some time, and now she lives with her older brothers. Thankfully, Helen isn’t a financial drain on her family because she has a profitable gift – she’s a master of … Continue reading Restoring Lost Loves.

Connecting Jewish Worlds

  Book Review for “White Zion” by Gila Green. Miriam’s father is a dark-skinned Israeli from Yemen, and her mother is a fair-skinned Jew from Canada. Their histories and families, together with Miriam’s own experiences, span across many decades and take us from pre-Statehood Israel, to Ottawa, to modern Jerusalem. This is the essence of … Continue reading Connecting Jewish Worlds

Finding Gin’s Fizz

Book Review for “The Wicked Redhead” by Beatriz Williams. There are two main characters in this book. Geneva (aka Ginger, aka Gin) Kelly, and Ella Gilbert. According to Goodreads, Ginger is “a smart-mouthed flapper from Appalachia, barely survived a run-in with her notorious bootlegger stepfather. She and Oliver Anson, a Prohibition agent she has inconveniently … Continue reading Finding Gin’s Fizz

Liberty, Equality, Sorority!

Book Review for “Ribbons of Scarlet: A Novel of the French Revolution’s Women” by Stephanie Dray, Laura Kamoie, E. Knight, Sophie Perinot, Kate Quinn, and Heather Webb. This is not a novel but it’s also very much a novel. To be precise, rather it’s a collection of six short stories (or more accurately, six short … Continue reading Liberty, Equality, Sorority!

Saving a Whole World.

Book Review for “The Last Train to London” by Meg Waite Clayton. This is the fictionalized story of Geertruida Wijsmuller, aka “Tante Truus” the Dutch, Christian woman who saved over 10,000 mostly Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis through what came to be known as the Kindertransport. Although this is historical fiction, the … Continue reading Saving a Whole World.

A Good Ghost.

Book Review for “Signed, Mata Hari” by Yannick Murphy. Margaretha Zelle, aka Mata Hari, was a woman who lived a strange and disjointed life, and died in disgrace, executed for her spying during the first World War. This historical, biographical novel describes her complex history from her early life in the Netherlands, to her loveless … Continue reading A Good Ghost.

Three for the Price of One.

Book Review for “The Lady and the Highwayman” by Sarah M. Eden. During Victorian England, there were essentially two types of books available. Of course, one was considered literature; well written tales that both middle and upper classes found worthy of reading, known as "silver-fork" novels. The other was what they called “penny dreadfuls” which … Continue reading Three for the Price of One.