A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Book Review for “Begin Again” by Ursula Orange. Jane, Florence, Leslie, and Sylvia are four friends from their days at Oxford. Since going down, their lives have taken different paths. Jane and Florence live together in a tiny flat in London; Sylvia and Leslie are back at their family homes. None of them are poor, … Continue reading A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Dialing into Trouble.

Book Review for “The Operator” by Gretchen Berg. Vivian Dalton was born and raised in Wooster (Ohio), and she knows what living in a small town is like – everyone knows everyone else’s business. But as Vivian says, she gets feelings about people, its her intuition. Her daughter Charlotte would say, that it’s more her … Continue reading Dialing into Trouble.

TCL’s Throwback Thursday #1 – March 5, 2020.

What is Throwback Thursday? I've noticed several of these meme on a few book blogs. For example, Susan Loves Books does one, which is (or was originally) hosted by Renee@It’s Book Talk. I also noticed that another fellow blogger, Lorrea @ What 'Cha Readin'?, was doing this as a monthly meme for her blog. In … Continue reading TCL’s Throwback Thursday #1 – March 5, 2020.

The Highest of Serene Societies.

Book Review for “The Girl in White Gloves” by Kerri Maher. Grace Kelly was a young woman on the rise in Hollywood, already with an Oscar award, when she met Rainier, the Prince of Monaco, which led her on a path she never would have scripted for herself. It is a Cinderella, fairy-tale story with … Continue reading The Highest of Serene Societies.

A Sheepishly Pseudo Autobiography.

Book Review for “The Lost Diary of M” by Paul Wolfe. This book is written as if it is the diary of Mary Pinchot, an American painter who was murdered October 12, 1964, shot twice at close range, and whose death remains an unsolved mystery to this day. What makes her murder so significant is … Continue reading A Sheepishly Pseudo Autobiography.

The Ironic Wit of William.

Book Review for “The Dreams of Bethany Mellmoth” by William Boyd. This is actually a collection of seven short stories plus two that are novella length – the first of those is the titular story, and the other one is “The Vanishing Game: An Adventure…” The short stories included here are: The Man Who Liked … Continue reading The Ironic Wit of William.

Tempo of Progression.

Book Review for “Take Nothing with You” by Patrick Gale. According to the back of this book, “Eustace, an only child, is leading a strange existence in a houseful of elderly adults. His life changes dramatically with the arrival of Carla Gold, his cello teacher, who casts a heady spell over everyone, including his mother. … Continue reading Tempo of Progression.

Restoring Lost Loves.

Book Review for “The Ghost of Madison Avenue” by Nancy Bilyeau. Helen O’Neill, the only daughter of the Connelly family, has been a widow for some time, and now she lives with her older brothers. Thankfully, Helen isn’t a financial drain on her family because she has a profitable gift – she’s a master of … Continue reading Restoring Lost Loves.

Connecting Jewish Worlds

  Book Review for “White Zion” by Gila Green. Miriam’s father is a dark-skinned Israeli from Yemen, and her mother is a fair-skinned Jew from Canada. Their histories and families, together with Miriam’s own experiences, span across many decades and take us from pre-Statehood Israel, to Ottawa, to modern Jerusalem. This is the essence of … Continue reading Connecting Jewish Worlds

Sunsetting at Dawn

Book Review for “Daisy Jones & The Six” by Taylor Jenkins Reid. By now, because of all the hype and publicity around this book (which I very uncharacteristically gave into), I’m sure most people already know that this novel is about a rock band from the 60s and 70s who had a huge success with … Continue reading Sunsetting at Dawn