Restoring Lost Loves.

Book Review for “The Ghost of Madison Avenue” by Nancy Bilyeau. Helen O’Neill, the only daughter of the Connelly family, has been a widow for some time, and now she lives with her older brothers. Thankfully, Helen isn’t a financial drain on her family because she has a profitable gift – she’s a master of … Continue reading Restoring Lost Loves.

Connecting Jewish Worlds

  Book Review for “White Zion” by Gila Green. Miriam’s father is a dark-skinned Israeli from Yemen, and her mother is a fair-skinned Jew from Canada. Their histories and families, together with Miriam’s own experiences, span across many decades and take us from pre-Statehood Israel, to Ottawa, to modern Jerusalem. This is the essence of … Continue reading Connecting Jewish Worlds

Sunsetting at Dawn

Book Review for “Daisy Jones & The Six” by Taylor Jenkins Reid. By now, because of all the hype and publicity around this book (which I very uncharacteristically gave into), I’m sure most people already know that this novel is about a rock band from the 60s and 70s who had a huge success with … Continue reading Sunsetting at Dawn

TCL is joining the New Release Challenge (again) for 2020!

2020 New Release Challenge Sign-up About the 2020 New Release Challenge The 2020 New Release Challenge is a year-long challenge in which the hosts aim to read books released in 2020.  Lexxie (un)Conventional Bookworms and Brandee are the sole hosts of the challenge, and they are happy to have as many people to sign up … Continue reading TCL is joining the New Release Challenge (again) for 2020!

A Path to Changing Gears.

Book Review for “The Art of Regret” by Mary Fleming. Trevor McFarquhar is an American in Paris. No this isn’t a re-imagining of the classic Gershwin musical; rather, it is a study in displacement on the backdrop of tragedy. You see, Trevor has been living in Paris since he was a boy, since not long … Continue reading A Path to Changing Gears.

Games, Sets, and Mismatched.

Book Review for “Right After the Weather” by Carol Anshaw. Cate is a theater set designer in Chicago, and in 2016 her career has hit a bumpy road, along with her love life, both of which she’s trying to repair. In the meanwhile, her ex-husband and his dog are camping out in the apartment he … Continue reading Games, Sets, and Mismatched.

Liberty, Equality, Sorority!

Book Review for “Ribbons of Scarlet: A Novel of the French Revolution’s Women” by Stephanie Dray, Laura Kamoie, E. Knight, Sophie Perinot, Kate Quinn, and Heather Webb. This is not a novel but it’s also very much a novel. To be precise, rather it’s a collection of six short stories (or more accurately, six short … Continue reading Liberty, Equality, Sorority!

Saving a Whole World.

Book Review for “The Last Train to London” by Meg Waite Clayton. This is the fictionalized story of Geertruida Wijsmuller, aka “Tante Truus” the Dutch, Christian woman who saved over 10,000 mostly Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis through what came to be known as the Kindertransport. Although this is historical fiction, the … Continue reading Saving a Whole World.

A Good Ghost.

Book Review for “Signed, Mata Hari” by Yannick Murphy. Margaretha Zelle, aka Mata Hari, was a woman who lived a strange and disjointed life, and died in disgrace, executed for her spying during the first World War. This historical, biographical novel describes her complex history from her early life in the Netherlands, to her loveless … Continue reading A Good Ghost.

Three for the Price of One.

Book Review for “The Lady and the Highwayman” by Sarah M. Eden. During Victorian England, there were essentially two types of books available. Of course, one was considered literature; well written tales that both middle and upper classes found worthy of reading, known as "silver-fork" novels. The other was what they called “penny dreadfuls” which … Continue reading Three for the Price of One.