War with Doughnuts and Coffee.

Book Review for “The Beantown Girls” by Jane Healey. The year is 1944, and Fiona Denning’s fiancé Danny, has been reported missing in action in Germany. Instead of staying home and worrying, she recruits her two best friends from college to join up with the Red Cross to become “Clubmobile Girls,” handing out coffee and … Continue reading War with Doughnuts and Coffee.

An Almost Famous Woman

Charmian London was the second wife of the highly prolific author, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist, and political essayist Jack “Wolf” London. Although only married for 10 years, their relationship was highly publicized and public.

A Family Inventory

Judith Kratt has been living in her family home in the small town of Bound South Carolina all her life, and she’s taken care of all that it contains – every piece of furniture, both valuable and worthless.

Burning in Barbados.

In Barbados, the two neighboring sugar plantations of Peverills and Beckles had always been somehow joined, and yet somehow remained separate, if not at war with each other. The Bussa's Rebellion of 1816 saw Peverills burned to the ground, while Beckles survived. While it seemed that the secrets that preceded that fateful event went up in smoke, forty years later, when Emily inherits what’s left of Peverills, she begins to sift through the ashes. Despite the best efforts of the present residents of Beckles, sparks begin to fly, reigniting the past and revealing the truths behind all the lies.

The Diamond and the Rough.

The thing that people will immediately realize about this book is that this isn’t one story, but its actually two stories. On the one hand, we have Werner’s story – the orphaned boy, living with his sister in a mining town in Germany.

The Tempers of Historic Toronto.

This book was published in 1987 and frankly, I’m shocked that I hadn’t read this before now. It should have caught my eye sooner, since it is actually historical fiction. I mean, talk about my genre, right? Plus - HELLO! Ondaatje! Well, I have no excuses, but thankfully, I’ve now rectified this embarrassing oversight.

Puttin’ on the Resistance.

Book Review for “Mistress of the Ritz” by Melanie Benjamin. Benjamin’s latest novel is about Blanche Auzello, the American woman who in 1924 married Claude, the manager of the Ritz in Paris. In the years of recovery after the Great War, Paris was host to some of the richest and most famous people from across … Continue reading Puttin’ on the Resistance.

A Poetically Explosive Story.

Book Review for “My Counterfeit Self” by Jane Davis. Lucy Forrester is a poet. That means by definition that she uses her words to express all the emotions she’s feeling, be they personal or be they political. In fact, she’s something of a rebel, but one with a cause she’s not willing to give up; … Continue reading A Poetically Explosive Story.

The Conundrum of the Phenomenon.

Book Review for “The Girl Puzzle: A Story of Nellie Bly” by Kate Braithwaite. This new historical, biographical, fiction novel is about Elizabeth Cochrane, the investigative journalist of the late 19th century and early 20th century, who was better known as Nellie Bly. Apparently, Bly is a hot topic at the moment, since this is … Continue reading The Conundrum of the Phenomenon.

Going for the Second Chances.

Book Review of "Old Baggage" by Lissa Evans. It is 1928, and Matilda (aka Mattie) Simpkin is living with her old friend from her Women's Suffrage Campaign days, Florrie Lee (lovingly known as “The Flea”), and still giving lectures on the suffragette movement, and why it is still important.