Scottish Shadows.

Book Review for “The Bass Rock” by Evie Wyld. From the blurb: “Surging out of the sea, the Bass Rock has always borne witness to the lives that pass under its shadow on the Scottish mainland. And across the centuries, the fates of three women are inextricably linked to this place and to each other. … Continue reading Scottish Shadows.

Perching in Perilous Pockets.

Book Review for “Cher Ami and Major Whittlesey” by Kathleen Rooney. Official blurb: From the green countryside of England and the gray canyons of Wall Street come two unlikely heroes: one a pigeon and the other a soldier. Answering the call to serve in the war to end all wars, neither Cher Ami, the messenger … Continue reading Perching in Perilous Pockets.

And yet… she DID!

Book Review for “Why I Don't Write and Other Stories” by Susan Minot. According to Goodreads, this collection of short stories includes: A writer dryly catalogs the myriad reasons she cannot write; an artist bicycles through protests in lower Manhattan and ruminates on an elusive lover; an old woman on her deathbed calls out for … Continue reading And yet… she DID!

Restoring Lost Loves.

Book Review for “The Ghost of Madison Avenue” by Nancy Bilyeau. Helen O’Neill, the only daughter of the Connelly family, has been a widow for some time, and now she lives with her older brothers. Thankfully, Helen isn’t a financial drain on her family because she has a profitable gift – she’s a master of … Continue reading Restoring Lost Loves.

Nine Times Naughty Atwood

Book Review for “Stone Mattress: Nine Wicked Tales” by Margaret Atwood According Harper’s Bazar’s the blurb on the back of this book, “Stone Mattress, a collection of nine, acerbic, mischievous, gulpable short stories, addresses themes that will resonate with anyone familiar with Atwood’s writing. Atwood’s gimlet eye and sharp tongue are turned on the ageing … Continue reading Nine Times Naughty Atwood

Three for the Price of One.

Book Review for “The Lady and the Highwayman” by Sarah M. Eden. During Victorian England, there were essentially two types of books available. Of course, one was considered literature; well written tales that both middle and upper classes found worthy of reading, known as "silver-fork" novels. The other was what they called “penny dreadfuls” which … Continue reading Three for the Price of One.

Some Like it… with Ghosts!

Book Review of “The Beautiful Strangers” by Camille Di Maio. There are actually two women named Kate Morgan. One of them is a ghost haunting at the famous Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego, since her death in 1892. The other one is a young girl who is stuck working in her family’s fish and … Continue reading Some Like it… with Ghosts!