#LetsDiscuss2020 – Reading Older Novels – TCL’s #DiscussionSunday #4.

Older novels... we've all read them in our time; often because we had to (for school). Many people hate reading them, or have a hard time reading them. Others love them. That made me think of writing about this topic: Reading Older Novels. Not long ago, I was on a Facebook group where someone noted … Continue reading #LetsDiscuss2020 – Reading Older Novels – TCL’s #DiscussionSunday #4.

A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

Book Review for “Begin Again” by Ursula Orange. Jane, Florence, Leslie, and Sylvia are four friends from their days at Oxford. Since going down, their lives have taken different paths. Jane and Florence live together in a tiny flat in London; Sylvia and Leslie are back at their family homes. None of them are poor, … Continue reading A 20th Century “Jane Austen” Novel?

#LetsDiscuss2020 – How Do You Read? – TCL’s #DiscussionSunday #3.

While wandering around Facebook a while back, author Jane Davis put up a very interesting post, asking the question: How Do You Read? By this, she didn't mean print, or audio, or eBooks. No, this is exactly what she posted: “After last week's Twitter debate about whether people constantly hear thoughts or whether their thoughts … Continue reading #LetsDiscuss2020 – How Do You Read? – TCL’s #DiscussionSunday #3.

#LetsDiscuss2020 – Why Won’t You Let Me Like You? – TCL’s #DiscussionSunday #2.

So, I’ve been blogging for quite some time now, and I follow hundreds of book blogs – literally, hundreds. But there’s something I’ve always wanted to know. Why do some blogs not have “like” buttons for their posts? I mean, having a “like” button is very convenient for me. It means I can visit someone’s … Continue reading #LetsDiscuss2020 – Why Won’t You Let Me Like You? – TCL’s #DiscussionSunday #2.

The Ironic Wit of William.

Book Review for “The Dreams of Bethany Mellmoth” by William Boyd. This is actually a collection of seven short stories plus two that are novella length – the first of those is the titular story, and the other one is “The Vanishing Game: An Adventure…” The short stories included here are: The Man Who Liked … Continue reading The Ironic Wit of William.

Tempo of Progression.

Book Review for “Take Nothing with You” by Patrick Gale. According to the back of this book, “Eustace, an only child, is leading a strange existence in a houseful of elderly adults. His life changes dramatically with the arrival of Carla Gold, his cello teacher, who casts a heady spell over everyone, including his mother. … Continue reading Tempo of Progression.

#LetsDiscuss2020 – Cultural Appropriation in Fiction – A TCL Literary Musings Post.

With this post, I've decided to join the 2020 Discussion Challenge, hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight! I'll probably just reach the "Discussion Dabbler" level (1-10 discussion posts), but who knows? Maybe I'll do more with my first year doing this blogging challenge! For my first … Continue reading #LetsDiscuss2020 – Cultural Appropriation in Fiction – A TCL Literary Musings Post.

#6Degrees of Separation for February 1, 2020.

Find out how I went from "Fleishman is in Trouble" by Taffy Brodesser-Akner to "Light Shining in the Forest" by the late, great Paul Torday in this month's #6Degrees of Separation.