Saving a Whole World.

Book Review for “The Last Train to London” by Meg Waite Clayton. This is the fictionalized story of Geertruida Wijsmuller, aka “Tante Truus” the Dutch, Christian woman who saved over 10,000 mostly Jewish children from the clutches of the Nazis through what came to be known as the Kindertransport. Although this is historical fiction, the … Continue reading Saving a Whole World.

#6Degrees of Separation for September 7, 2019.

From “A Gentleman in Moscow” by Amor Towles to “The Last Mrs. Parrish” by Liv Constantine. This is a monthly link-up hosted by Kate at Books Are My Favourite and Best. Each month a book is chosen as a starting point and linked to six other books to form a chain. A book doesn’t need … Continue reading #6Degrees of Separation for September 7, 2019.

A Good Ghost.

Book Review for “Signed, Mata Hari” by Yannick Murphy. Margaretha Zelle, aka Mata Hari, was a woman who lived a strange and disjointed life, and died in disgrace, executed for her spying during the first World War. This historical, biographical novel describes her complex history from her early life in the Netherlands, to her loveless … Continue reading A Good Ghost.

Hiding Her Time.

Book Review for “Vivian” by Christina Hesselholdt. If you’ve never heard of Vivian Maier, that’s totally understandable. In fact, no one knew about her until about 2007, two years before she died, when the contents of her storage facilities were sold because she wasn’t paying her bills. What they found was a trove of her … Continue reading Hiding Her Time.

The Price of Copper.

Book Review for “The Women of the Copper Country” by Mary Doria Russell. Anna Klobuchar Clemenc (or Clements) was known as “Big Annie” but also received the moniker of America’s Joan of Arc for her leadership with the Women’s Auxiliary No. 15 of the Western Federation of Miners during the months long strike in Calumet, … Continue reading The Price of Copper.

An Almost Famous Woman

Charmian London was the second wife of the highly prolific author, poet, playwright, screenwriter, journalist, and political essayist Jack “Wolf” London. Although only married for 10 years, their relationship was highly publicized and public.

Puttin’ on the Resistance.

Book Review for “Mistress of the Ritz” by Melanie Benjamin. Benjamin’s latest novel is about Blanche Auzello, the American woman who in 1924 married Claude, the manager of the Ritz in Paris. In the years of recovery after the Great War, Paris was host to some of the richest and most famous people from across … Continue reading Puttin’ on the Resistance.

The Conundrum of the Phenomenon.

Book Review for “The Girl Puzzle: A Story of Nellie Bly” by Kate Braithwaite. This new historical, biographical, fiction novel is about Elizabeth Cochrane, the investigative journalist of the late 19th century and early 20th century, who was better known as Nellie Bly. Apparently, Bly is a hot topic at the moment, since this is … Continue reading The Conundrum of the Phenomenon.

Photos of Female Fighters

Book Review for “Women on the Front Lines: Inside the Combat Units of the Israeli Army” by Debbie Zimelman. Yes, this is a photography book, and yes, I've never reviewed one of these before. But you see... Debbie is a personal friend of mine. We were work colleagues for a while many years ago, just … Continue reading Photos of Female Fighters